Part 2: Pursuing Professional Goals as a Young Mom

 

As a follow-up to Part 1 on why having kids young might be the best thing for your career, here are some very basic, general tips on making it happen.

So what can you do?

1. Identify your goals. Write them down, make a dream board — but don't limit yourself.

2. Finish any education that you absolutely need to finish. It might take longer, it might require digging for scholarships and grants, and it might be really exhausting. But you can do this.

3. Even if it's not possible to finish your education right now, at least find work in the field you want to be in.

4. Not only that, but surround yourself with the people who are doing things that you want to be doing. When I was at Camp Mighty back in Novemeber, Pinterest Founder Ben Silbermann gave us the same advice. When he was young and just starting out, he packed up and moved to Silicon Valley because that's where people were making things happen. Find your tribe — whether it's geographically or virtually (like on blogs). Stop hanging out with people who bring you down, and surround yourself with support and knowledge.

5. Be really, really, really, really persistent. Every job I've ever gotten has been because I've been insanely persistent. I once called an editor's cell phone (that I probably wasn't supposed to have) and left voicemails two times about a gig. Luckily this editor had a similar ambition level as mine, and she thought my calls showed a go-getter attitude similar to her own, rather than what it was: a borderline-inappropriate cross of boundary lines. (Tread carefully, my friend.) But take the risks and show how bad you want it — even if it's just a low-paying part-time internship (which, by the way, is how I started at Babble.com).

6. Work really, really, really, really hard. And then just keep working at it. Find your balance, while knowing that work-life balance is rarely balanced. Separate your "mom time" from your "work time" as much as possible. And know that just because you're taking a slower pace, or an entirely different path than you originally envisioned, that doesn't mean you won't get where you want to go.

Do you have any advice for young moms chasing a professional dream?

Photo: Etsy/Kensie Kate